Back up and running 8


I still can’t figure out what I did to mess up my blog and site. Turns out it may have been a blessing in disguise. I decided to change my project. Instead of revisiting my map project from last semester which focused on the size of the American home in relation to the American family, I decided to revisit one of my most beloved projects. The discovery of Baby Hammocks in Milwaukee. There is a great story that goes along with the images I want to use in my project. Besides the images, I can integrate maps and other techniques we learned in class.

Unfortunately for me, that means I have to start from scratch. Hopefully I will have at least the basic framework up before class tomorrow. I have been working through the week and weekend to get it done. I am suffering from screen fatigue.

Speaking of screen fatigue I discovered something during the photo retouching lessons. My glasses have a coating on them to help eye fatigue and block blue light. They have a light tint to them, I realized a while ago they make white appear sepia. I am used to it. On occasionally do I notice it, for example, when I put clean sheets on my bed, I thought they were dingy because they were off white. Turns out it was just the glasses. I have adjusted to the off white walls, slightly off color things I see all the time. However, doing this project, I forgot and all of a sudden I realized the coloring I was doing was way way way way way brighter and off color than I thought. I had to make the adjustment to either not using my computer glasses or looking over the rims to see the real color.

LP bbh

 

Here is the original. I can see the benefit of being able to crop and retouch the original. As a matter of fact it is the ability to mess with resolutions that allowed me to figure out what this building was, where it was, and a whole host of other details. Here is the colorized:

bbh 2

 

I like it, but I don’t know that I would use it. I would certainly airbrush out the 108 in the upper corner and crop out the other writing, but I wouldn’t colorize. I am a purist. I like the black and white look of the original. The fun part of this was figuring out how to find the right colors. Milwaukee is also known as “Cream City” it was a city built on bricks that were cream colored due to the different clay in the soil. The water tower and other tower in behind the building are made of the cream city brick. I was very careful to find a matching color. To do it, I used the eyedropper tool on an already colorized picture (modern day) to match.

13669.24168

Over all I see the benefit of colorizing photos, but I just don’t know that I would do it for my own work.

 

 

 


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8 thoughts on “Back up and running

  • Jenna

    Good job recoloring! Wow, good luck on a new project – it sounds really interesting. I know what you mean about color adjustments, I was talking to a professional photographer (happens to volunteer at the museum) and he suggested I re-calibrate my computer screen. Haven’t figured out how to do it yet, but I’ll let you know!

  • Kater

    I understand what you mean about the color differences. My glasses are the same way when I wear them. sometimes it is the computer that is different too. When we built our websites, I pick a color that looked light green on my computer, but ended up looking lavender everywhere else.

  • Claire

    It must have been frustrating to have the color so off. I would have gone crazy with it. Your colored photographs look great! I can’t wait to see the rest of your photoshopped images!

  • Lacey

    I also had some issues getting my colors what I thought was jujutsu right. It was frustrating and very time consuming, especially with all of the mode options. Over all, though, I think your colorization looks great!

  • Tam

    I love what you did with the images in terms of colors – they came out looking great! And I think that you bring up an extremely important point with the glasses. It is so easy to forget some of these things that might affect how our work looks to others.